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malaysian mondays #02

September 7, 2009

I contemplated, just for a second, going through my holiday chronologically. But straight after Malaysian Mondays #01 came a whirlwind five day trip to Hainan Island, China (where, strangely enough, there was nary a Hainan Chicken to be seen), and I could hardly do a Malaysian Mondays post on China.

“So,” I thought, “why not skip over that side trip and recommence where I land squarely back on Malaysian soil” ebooks kostenlos downloaden deutsch pdf. And that is what I am doing.

“Lunch”

malaysian hawker stand

malaysian hawker stand

We had survived five days of non-stop coach travel, a different hotel each night and the sun so hot that I had resorted to carrying an umbrella over my head in broad daylight like a proper Asian tourist.

My aunt (the same aunt who has her nasi lemak man’s hand phone number, sister of my mother) had collected us from the airport and immediately took us to go get some lunch teamviewer 13 kostenlos downloaden. This being despite the fact that we’d just eaten lunch on the plane.

dry won ton mee

dry won ton mee

I wasn’t going to complain, though, because a hawker lunch (this one being ceilinged but only two-walled) meant I got my first taste of won ton mee.

I. Love. Won ton mee.

Not the soupy stuff, the dark and caramelised stuff, with a side bowl of wonton soup and an almost-as-large bowl of pickled green chilli cubase 9 kostenlos. Heaven.

char kway teow (fried rice noodles)

char kway teow (fried rice noodles)

This didn’t, however stop me from stealing… I mean sharing my mother’s plate of char kway teow. I don’t know how they do it, but that smoky “breath of the wok” thing they do over there is amazing.

And see that plastic cup in the background mp3 music download kostenlos runterladen? Hot barley. Be still my heart!

My aunty’s storecupboard…

kuih lapis (malay layer cake)

kuih lapis (malay layer cake)

… is full of amazing things that are pulled out at great speed and urged on you with such a highly developed skill of persuasion that it is nigh on impossible to say no.

“Three different types of kuih lapis!” she said, nudging the plate in my direction. “My colleague’s friend makes them kostenlos russische musik herunterladen. They’re very good – hard to get. She only makes it sometimes!”. I nibble at a corner of each.

mung bean paste cake (ang koo kueh)

mung bean paste cake (ang koo kueh)

“Hey! Ang koo kueh!” she says, as I munch. And I don’t try these, despite being told of their origin (somebody’s aunty’s friend this time) because my mum makes amazing versions of these sweet bean paste filled steamed kueh and I am feeling a little ill from overeating tiptoi book cannot beed.

pulasan

pulasan

But then… “You seen these before?” And at first I think I have, but they aren’t rambutan. “Pulasan” she says. “Native to Malaysia. I bought them this morning. You should try!”

And I try. And I try some more nieuwe ios download. And then, at long last, I am so full that even my desire to try yet again is overruled by my stomach’s protests.

Dinner

BBQ steamboat van

BBQ steamboat van

I try to snatch a nap before dinner, but spend the afternoon trawling Malaysian food blogs with my cousins instead. We are contemplating dinner, and a fun-filled one at that, it being the eve of both mine & my grandmother’s birthdays.

On the way to Asia Cafe, we stop to pick up some cake bandicam for free. And while my mother and aunty argue over who should pay for the cake (with my granny protesting and saying she doesn’t want cake anyway) I spot this van and wonder if all food couldn’t just come on wheels…

teh-C (condensed milk and coconut tea)

teh-C (condensed milk and coconut tea)

Teh-C is the latest drink to come out of Malaysian tea houses. A lick of gula melaka (hydrated palm sugar) is topped with unsweetened condensed milk and topped again with a splash of Boh Tea. So pretty, and so refreshing waffen spiele kostenlosen.

asia cafe

asia cafe

Asia Cafe is a sprawling mass of eateries, each specialising in small selection of dishes. There’s a Thai joint, a pizzeria and a couple of Japanese stalls.

asia cafe

asia cafe

There is barbecue duck, dumpling specialists, noodle specialists and satay specialists herunterladen. I am lost in amongst the multitude and my mother laughs when I look around in panic from having lost her.

pai tee shells

pai tee shells

We order pai tee for everybody – the thin batter shells stuffed with a shredded jicama mix crunch between my teeth and fall everywhere in a mess. Popiah (thin crepe-like pancakes wrapped around the same mixture) is also ordered, and I’m brought back to the days when we used to sit in the garage with a butane stove, a pot of hot oil, a bowl of batter and the sizzle and spit of freshly made pai tee shells being made.

chicken satay

chicken satay

Chicken satay is grilled over smoldering coals. Wedges of cucumber and onion are dipped into the chunky peanutty sauce and consumed with emptied sticks to clear the palate.

pork and chive dumplings

pork and chive dumplings

Burnish bottomed pork and chive dumplings and xiao long bao are also ordered (despite their non-Malaysian-ness). But this is Asia Cafe, and, being part of Asian cuisine, these aren’t done badly at all. (Though the pizzas I saw being eaten at other tables left some to be desired).

dry curry mee

dry curry mee

And more, and more, and more. Plates of fried rice (from Thailand and Japan) and a bowl of curry mee with a healthy kick of super sour lime and a dry heat that rushes up your nose as you eat it.

A birthday song for myself and my granny, and a long cartrip home.

Thus endeth the second day.


  • #1
    September 7th, 2009

    I’ve always been interested in sweets from asian countries. They definitely got very unique characteristics to them. Hmm teh-C sounds very good!

  • #2
    September 7th, 2009

    ahhhHHHH dry won ton mee!! *cries* and barley!! What were the pulasan like? I’ve never seen them before but they look easier to peel compared to rambutans

  • #3
    September 7th, 2009

    Oh my goodness… the lok-lok van! I feel very homesick right now….thanks for sharing. (And hey! I’ve got Malaysian Monday too…maybe all the Malaysian bloggers should get in on the act :)…let’s storm the net!)

  • #4
    September 7th, 2009

    I.love.won.ton.mee too! Siiigh. What’s the thing in the layer cake? Are they prunes?

  • #5
    September 7th, 2009

    Mmm I am eyeing that dry curry mee

  • #6
    September 7th, 2009

    I miss M’sia…..went there twice and love food in those red plate πŸ™‚ want char kway teow now T_T

  • #7
    September 7th, 2009

    I thought I ate lots while in Malaysia. look at choo!!! but hey, don’t stop, EAT SOME MORE! LOL

  • #8
    September 8th, 2009

    Me three, I(also).love.won.ton.mee! Happily I’ll be going back to Malaysia soon, where I intend to each enough to sink into a wonton mee coma, oh yes.

  • #9
    September 9th, 2009

    i am such a sucker for ang ku kueh, that picture made my stomach ache with longing!!!

  • #10
    September 9th, 2009

    Homesick already! I only came back form Malaysia 2 months ago πŸ™

  • #11
    Chik
    September 9th, 2009

    +1,another won.ton.mee fanatic. If anyone knows a decent outlet where I can get some, pleease post. I want one.ton. of it!!

  • #12
    September 11th, 2009

    @Yas: Yeah, it’s that subtle non-cane sugar sweetness that just rocks my world. I’m gonna go try make Teh C this summer I think.

    @Steph: They were about as peelable as rambutan but without the weird feeling of having fruity hairs in your mouth. I bite mine to crack them open. My cousins think I’m nuts.

    @Shaz: I hear you sister! Will be sending some love your way come Monday πŸ™‚

    @Y: I think (from memory) that they were dates. And oh! I have a rat tail recipe for you. It is not quite wonton mee, but it sure is tasty. Must remember to send it your way!

    @FFichiban: I know right? I was being all polite and “No you have some. It’s ok” and secretly going “Argh! Want CURRY MEEE!”

    @Ja: But where to find it in Sydney with smoky goodness and briney cockles? Where?!

    @Billy: All in one day! *faint* I don’t know what I’ll do when I get to posting about the dinners…

    @lili: Oh yes. I can see you turning into a giant bowl of wonton mee, complete with speckles of shallot floating around in the soup. πŸ™‚

    @Mei: Oh! It took me so long to appreciate them (not my sister, she used to steal the tou sa from the pot when mum wasn’t looking) but now I love love love them.

    @Ellie: It’s only been a month and a half for me, and I’m already so so withdrawn!

    @Chik: Little secret, you can get it if you ask the Malaysian aunty (with bright red lipstick) at the store in the far back corner of the Galeries Victoria (on Pitt St). It’s not on the menu, and it’s Hong Kong style, but it’s a decent meal for when the craving strikes!

  • #13
    March 29th, 2011

    “the same aunt who has her nasi lemak manÒ€ℒs hand phone number”LOL..

Shez