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mocha prune & pecan breakfast loaf

June 8, 2015

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I am not good at eating breakfast.

While most people on the internet seem to love the meal, posting #vscocam’d instagrams of oozing eggs and crispy kale, bircher muesli topped with freeze dried raspberries and coffee (oh! the latte art!), I am most likely¬†starving.

Belly empty, fingers freezing, driving my Koji to work because I’m a #goodwife.

(Mostly.)

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We started off so well.

On the first day of work, I made bacon & egg rolls, coffee, juice, tea. We rocked up a little earlier than expected. I told him to call me if he needed company at lunchtime, because his new office is near my office and hey! Lunch buddies!

On the second day of work, we were running late. I had to photograph some flatlays before we left (and we’d eaten all-you-can-eat Indian for dinner the night before, and everyone knows that leads to #nobreakfastplease come the next day).

On the third day of work, we were back to the bacon & egg rolls etc etc , though with slightly more complaining than normal and no sauce because we ran out. Also, we ate the last of the bacon.

One can only guess how the rest of the week unravelled.

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Here’s where I make the admission that these photographs are a year old, spurred by the discovery of a semi-local (ok, two hours north) pecan grower that made his fortnightly appearance at our local markets.

He taught me how to crack them and I brought a kilo of unhulled nuts home to nibble on as I worked with numb hands.

And then I got a little tired of eating so. many. pecans. and turned them into this hotch-potch of a loaf.

Turns out this hotch-potch of a loaf was so amazing that it disappeared in a day and a half and a second batch went similarly quickly.

Toasted until the edges are crisp and the middles are squidgy. A slab of butter melted on top (for me) and a big dollop of vanilla bean stirred through natural yoghurt (for him). Our brand new favourite breakfast.

Until it ran out. It, and our bag of fresh pecans.

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So to markets on Saturday in the hopes of seeing the return of the pecan man (and his mother). And in the meantime, I’ll warm the house with a chocolate chip version. Or maybe an almond version seeing as I’ve just bought myself half a kilo to nibble on.

One for the counter top, one for the freezer. Pre-sliced of course.

Either way, there’s no chance I’m waiting another year before making it again.

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mocha prune & pecan breakfast loaf
 
This loaf stays wonderously moist even after a few days wrapped up on the bench, though my favourite way to eat it involves a thick slice, toasted under the grill with a slab of melty butter on top. Of course. It's not quite sweet enough to be cake, not quite boring enough to be a bread. So, loaf. For breakfast. Or tea time. Or any time really.
Ingredients
  • 1 cup pitted prunes, chopped
  • ⅔ cup brown sugar
  • 60g butter
  • 250ml coffee (I used three shot of espresso, watered down to make 250ml)
  • ½ cup cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1½ cups plain flour
  • ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1 egg
  • ¾ cup pecans, chopped
How to make it
  1. Pre-heat your oven to 150C (fan forced).
  2. Line a loaf tin with baking paper, cutting it a bit bigger so the edges overhang.
  3. Chop the prunes finely and then put them in a saucepan with the brown sugar, butter, coffee, cocoa powder and bicarbonate of soda. Cook over a medium heat, stirring frequently, until the cocoa powder and butter are fully dissolved into the coffee liquid.
  4. Bring the contents of the saucepan to the boil and then remove it from the heat, leaving it to cool for at least 10 minutes.
  5. Sift the plain flour, baking powder and spices into a bowl. Add the egg, chopped pecans and the cooled date mixture and fold together thoroughly, making sure there aren't any lumps of flour left.
  6. Pour the mixture into the prepared loaf tin and bake for 1 hour. Test with a skewer at this point to make sure it's baked through. A wooden skewer should come out clean, with only a couple of crumbs clinging to it - if not, leave it in for another 15 minutes or so.
  7. Turn the loaf out onto a wire rack to cool before eating it.

 


  • #1
    Tricia
    July 26th, 2015

    can you please tell me what size loaf tin you use? Looks just amazing.

Shez