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bread in common, fremantle

December 5, 2013

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We arrived in Perth on the almost-midnight flight, Sara, Anna and I. Semi-delirious and rowdy, exhausted beyond imagination.

Keys retrieved, bags flung asunder, we launched ourselves through the door of our home for the next three nights to the sight of a rather startled Amy, fresh-faced and sore footed from the day’s expeditions.

(This is what I love about blogging, despite my usually introverted nature. Flying five and a bit hours across the country to meet, for the first time, a girl from your own city who has agreed to share an apartment with you and two of your equally exciteable and irritable blogging friends… and having her not run screaming to the nearest hotel.)

She held a plastic sleeve of neatly typed and printed recommendations for places to eat, sights to see and things to do in the Perth area, and once she’d gotten over the shock of our entrance (and once we’d made ourselves a mug or two of tea we’d swiped from the Virgin Lounge), talk turned to breakfast.

“There’s a place,” she timidly offered, “that a friend of mine from Perth recommended… if you were planning on going to Fremantle anyway… I hear it’s quite good?”

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We woke at 5am the next morning (darned time difference!) and lay about for as long as we could bear before piling ourselves into the hire car (Shotgun! Navigator!) and embarking on the half-hour journey to the happening beach-side town of Fremantle.

After rummaging through pockets for parking machine coins, peering through shop windows and taking more photos than we could ever reasonably publish, we followed Amy down one side street after another and into Bread in Common… to find that the kitchen didn’t open until 10am and that we had a half-hour wait before our rumbling bellies could be satisfied.

Le sigh!

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green smoothie & watermelon smoothie $10 each, coffee $3.50 (extra shots $0.50)

A rather surly and inattentive waitress took our drinks orders and we settled in with a menu and enough green in my juice to satisfy my already rumbling stomach.

(She turned out to be absolutely lovely not ten minutes later, and explained the menu with such honesty and warmth that I thought perhaps we’d been transported to an alternate universe. No matter, by that time I was thrilled with the service and quite over our initially bumpy start.)

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The menu, she explained, was designed for sharing. Bread for all and then a smattering of dips, meats and nibbles was recommended over our initial plans to get a dish each to pass around the table.

As the bread is baked fresh on the premises each morning (and as sourdough takes a nice, long time to get itself ready before baking) the kitchen can’t get its orders ready until the loaves are pulled out of the oven and cooled sufficiently for cutting.

This doesn’t stop us from ordering a little earlier though, so our requests can be first off the rank.

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wholemeal sourdough $2.00 per serve (two serves shown), whipped pork spread $4.00, zucchini spread $3.50

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wagyu brescaola with pickles and rocket $16

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sudok with rocket and pickles $14

We start with a plate of the wholemeal sourdough ($2 per serve, two serves pictured), some meats, dips and pickles.

The wagyu brescaola is suitably fatty, salty and paper thin, whilst the sudok, a chilli and spice rich sausage (not unlike salami) had us smacking our lips and reaching for swipes of yellow pickle and crisp rocket to balance out its robust flavour.

We also ordered two dips. The whipped pork and preserved lemon number had us ooh-ing and ahh-ing over its fluffy and very spreadable texture, punctuated with bursts of preserved lemon that refreshed the palate and had our eyes widening with surprise.

But my favourite thing, even more favourite than wagyu brescaola, was the smoked zucchini dip.

I have no words for that smoked zucchini. It was nutty and silky and subtly spiced, smoky and peppery and luscious. I swiped the bowl right clean.

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The nibbles we ordered to share came out shortly after, a plate of anchovy toasts with egg yolk and the curiously named mousetraps.

Our waitress had warned us that they were more beer and wine snacks than breakfast food, but we persisted… mostly because the thought of The Littlest Anchovy eating said anchovies was too humourous to pass up.

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anchovies and eggs $8.00

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mousetraps $8.00

I’m glad we listened to our instincts.

Imagine. Seven miniature herbed anchovy sandwiches, made from impossibly thin slices of baguette, filled with the salt and pungency of the sea, accompanied by cool, whipped egg yolk, softer and richer than any mayonnaise or custard could ever be.

They were delightful and I could very possibly have eaten the plate by myself.

The mousetraps, whilst cute, amounted to little more than open faced cheese and vegemite toasties, but on tiny slivers of baguette and served in a glass jar. The vegemite lovers chowed down happily, swiping bits of that lush egg yolk as a bonus topping.

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the common loaf $2.00 per serve

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A plate of the common loaf, fresh out of the oven landed on our table just as we were finishing, and we mopped up the last splashes of olive oil, pickle and spread with its wonderfully toothsome crust and springy, holey middles before heading to the bakery for treats.

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If we had a little longer in town, I might have been convinced to buy a whole loaf of the Common Loaf – at $6.50, it would have made a very hearty breakfast for the four of us, but we were heading to the fully catered Eat Drink Blog the next morning. I did steal away with some house canned sardines and a bottle of their magnificently peppery olive oil though, and will be popping those open on Boxing Day when my belly is well and truly sick of Christmas excesses.

After breakfast, we wandered through the streets of Fremantle, stopping ourselves from buying too many nice things and getting road ready for our little sojurn to the Swan Valley that afternoon. But not before seeing some of the artistry that’s located on the town’s walls, columns and carparks.

Til next time, Freo.

Bread in Common

43 Pakenham St, Fremantle WA 6160
Open daily from 10am – 10pm (Friday & Saturday open til 11:30pm)
No bookings, just rock up.

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If you’re planning on eating out in the month of December, consider heading to one of the 152 restaurants supporting Street Smart this year. A $2 donation to Street Smart can be added to your bill, which will go directly towards helping those on the streets during this holiday season. For more information about Dine Smart, or to find a list of restaurants and cafes, head to their website.


  • #1
    December 8th, 2013

    That freshly baked bread looks amazing! And lol surely snacks for breakfast are the best kind of breakfast around!

  • #2
    December 12th, 2013

    thank you for having me as an apartment buddy, i had heaps of fun! i am currently reminescing the fresh fluffy bread and that zucchini dip. heaven.

  • #3
    December 18th, 2013

    I still think about that anchovy toast…actually, I still think about that whole breakfast!

Shez