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indiana cafe, klang

April 9, 2012

There we were, lounging about in my grandfather’s house, when someone went and said “Lunch?”

Ears pricked up.

Mumbled words. Shoes on. We were off.

My family has been going to Indiana Cafe for almost as long as I remember. It’s known as “That good wonton mee place” or “The Indiana Jones noodles” or, more simply, “Ban ban mee”.

“Ban ban” (or “slow” in Hokkien), because the aunty running the store makes each serve to order. The noodles are cooked and refreshed. The sauce is heated. The portion is tossed together and plated.

And, when that is done, she starts cooking the next batch.

It means that each plate is fresh and perfectly coated in sauce. None of this awful claggy noodle, patchy sauce business you’ll find elsewhere. It also means it might take up to 10 minutes for your plate to come out. Which is considered slow around these parts where food ordered is typically served before you’ve finished your sentence and found the money to pay with.

She cooks rapidly. So rapidly that her arms move in blurs of motion.

We start with our favourite drink, teh-o ais limau. It’s a refreshing black tea sweetened with sugar syrup and hit with the unmistakeable tang of kalamansi lime.

It’s a drink I crave every Summer.

My Ah-ma orders a clear noodle soup instead of the fattier, cholesterol heavy signature dish. It comes as a tangle of slippery noodles in a fishy ikan bilis broth, topped with fish cakes and fish balls.

A plate of pan mee is also procured. Thicker, chewy egg noodles in a dark soy gravy with the same fish cake and fish balls and a sprinkling of shallots and fried onions.

And as they eat, we wait.

“Doo doo doo DOOO! Do do doooooo” whispers the Bean to me, to the tune of the theme.

“Indiana? That was the dog’s name!” I whisper back to her.

Raiders of the Lost Ark has always been a firm favourite in our family.

There is no more theme song singing when the noodles arrive.

Peppery ikan bilis soup holds three wontons, their skins so soft and silken that they resemble fancy fish swimming in the broth.

The noodles retain a bit of bite. Each is coated in a slurp of sauce that leaves a savory residue on our tongues gives rise to an almost inaudible groan of happiness.

The char siew (barbecued park) is fatty. It’s salty. It’s sweet. It’s eaten in between mouthfuls of noodle and pickled chilli and slurps of soup and suddenly, it was gone.

We thought of ordering another, but lunch hour was about to hit and there were places to be, things to do, and innumerable other foods to eat before our time in Klang was up.

——————–

(I forgot to bring my camera in amongst my packing haste so all photos have been taken on my camera phone. Whoops!)

I don’t know the address of Indiana Kafe. It’s on a slip road off the main highway and is marked on the map below (using the careful skills of my dad and I squinting at the google map satellite view and sussing out surrounding houses).


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  • #1
    April 9th, 2012

    I love the food in Klang, all my family and relatives in Malaysia were brought up there. There is so much amazing food in that city!

  • #2
    April 9th, 2012

    Omggggg SHEZ I want to eat everything in this post!! And the first few lines of this post gave me a good chuckle, thanks for that hehe. I’ve got a favourite drink too every time I go back to Malaysia. When in Malaysia, the drinks really are just as various and important as the food eh? 😉

  • #3
    April 11th, 2012

    WOW!! Every single picture in this post makes me hungry!! I love places that cook to order… food that’s been sitting around isn’t worth the time. What a cool place!

  • #4
    April 15th, 2012

    Random name for an eatery and, haha, where would we be without Google’s maps!

  • #5
    sara
    April 17th, 2012

    As soon as I saw the picture of the sign I noticed the unmistakable Indiana typography from the movie title. Was good to know you didn’t have to navigate spears, darts, naked natives and a giant boulder to eat those gorgeous looking noodles!

Shez