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porcini & pea risotto

September 7, 2010

They say time flies as you get older.

And, if the last month or so has been anything to go by, I’m certainly aging rapidly. Because I’m fairly certain that just yesterday I was ensconced in a pair of trackies and a hoodie celebrating a frosty birthday over ice-cream cake and swearing I wouldn’t last til Spring.

But here we are, and here I am well and truly in September (and having dated all of my filing for the last month with “April” – sorry Rob).

I’m not sure exactly what I’m going to do with a month’s worth of hearty Wintery soups, but I know exactly what I will be doing with this recipe. And that would be “making it again for the family so they don’t complain that The VTB & I ate all of the first batch“.

Or perhaps “making arancini once my mother decides to let me deep fry in the house / I buy myself an electric frypan for using on my front lawn“.

Or even “dancing flippantly around the VTB’s apartment at the sight of him eating his entire serve – peas and all!” Which, technically, was something I did following their successful introduction to the dish (despite a certain somebody’s hatred of the little green popping things) and not something I will do with the recipe forthwith.

(Did I also mention I spent a ridiculous amount of time in what-was-supposed-to-be-August at work? I think it’s catching up with me. And most definitely in the way I’ve been speaking. And drinking. I think I need some wine. *hic!*)

The other (very first-world) problem that this particular recipe solved was the partial depletion of that giant bag of porcinis that I’d picked up at the Simon Thomsen sale. Thanks to this deliciousness, there’s only two giant snap lock bags of porcini sitting in the VTB’s fridge & freezer (as opposed to two bustingly full bags).

So, erm, if anyone has a dried porcini recipe suggestion…


porcini & pea risotto
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • ¾ loosely thrown together cup of dried porcini
  • 1L boiling water
  • Alternatively, replace porcini & water with 500ml chicken stock
  • 200g arborio rice
  • 1 small onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 2 sprigs of rosemary
  • 2tbsp oil
  • 100g butter
  • ¾C white wine
  • 100g mixed mushrooms
  • ½C frozen peas
  • salt and pepper
  • parmesan cheese
How to make it
  1. Step by step instructions with images below

How to do it:

1. Toss your porcinis into a bowl and add the boiling water. Cover and leave for at least 15 minutes. If you are using a smaller quantity of porcinis, substitute some of the water with chicken stock and soak using the same method.

2. Pull the porcinis out of the stock and chop roughly. Carefully strain your mushroom stock into a pot, being careful to get rid of any dirt & grit at the bottom of the bowl from the porcinis. Keep the pot on the stove over a low heat.

3. Strip the rosemary off its stalk and finely chop the leaves. Finely dice your onion & garlic. Heat the oil and 25g of butter in a heavy bottomed pot and sautee the onion, garlic & rosemary. Add the rice and sautee until it is all coated in the fragrant oil mix.

4. Pour a glass of wine. Drink a quarter of it. Tip the rest into the rice pot and watch it sizzle and reduce to nothingness. Ladle a cup of the hot mushroom stock over the rice and let it reduce and get sucked up by the happy rice whilst stirring.

5. Once the stock has been absorbed, toss another cup over the top and push the rice around the pot while it gets absorbed.

6. Almost there. This time, add your chopped assorted mushrooms and porcinis in with the third cup of stock. Have a taste. Add some salt at this stage too. You’ll need quite a lot of it if you’re using just the porcini stock.

7. Last cup of stock goes in. Stir, stir, stir. When it’s looking goopy (ie: not dry, but not liquid) quickly stir your frozen peas, the rest of your butter (in cubes) and a good handful of cheese through, stick the lid on and carry it to the table. This way your peas will cook just enough to be not-frozen, but not so much that they’re yellow and mushy.

8. Add pepper. Add salt (if needed). Drizzle with extra olive oil if you wish. Eat. Dance. Fall on the floor groaning because you ate too much. Again.


  • #1
    September 7th, 2010

    It is always so easy to eat too much gloopy comfort food like risotto. So, you know, there’s not often the opportunity to have any leftovers with which to ponder arancini =)

  • #2
    September 8th, 2010

    Aww it did sound like you were working super hard, here’s hoping your September is lazier! That risotto looks lovely, damn I wish I had bagfuls of dried porcini

  • #3
    September 8th, 2010

    Ooooh yum! This looks so delicous! I’ll be making this one very soon! Thanks for sharing!

  • #4
    September 9th, 2010

    Fall on the floor groaning? Hehehe! More like lie flat on the couch for me. 🙂 Nice Recipe! Dried Porcini? If I have them in my fridge I’d use them with Tagliatelle.

  • #5
    September 15th, 2010

    Surely having too much procini is a good thing….I’ve got a small bit at home, will try the risotto but might have to supplement the porcinis with other mushrooms!

  • #6
    September 17th, 2010

    DROOLING.

    And heartbroken.

    I promised my son the Evil Golden Arches tonight and now I am dreaming of risotto.

  • #7
    Leah
    June 1st, 2011

    I’m terribly sorry, but I made this tonight and found it to be bland, boring, and desperately in need of something.

  • #8
    lilly
    November 7th, 2011

    do you work in a kitchen? i am a student chef, and i stumbled across this website from a video on youtube. you are very talented and i enjoy reading your recipes and watching your videos! keep up the good work! 🙂

Shez