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don’s smoked salami meatballs

December 7, 2009

I’m a bit of a faux-foodie. Actually, scratch that. I’m a lot of a faux-foodie. I smile animatedly when told about developments in the preservation of cheeses I’ve never heard of and throw “insightful” comments into conversations about tomato varietals. I love a robustly flavoured, home cooked meal – but often don’t know how to balance herbs and spices so that it tastes the way I imagine it should.

But (and here’s my little bit of authority when it comes to writing this blog of mine) I love food. I love eating it. I love learning about it. And I love creating new (and sometimes exciting) things for people to eat.

I’m fairly picky about the things I write about here – particularly when it comes to being paid for it. I know there’s a stigma about advertorial posts, but I choose to do them when I can honestly say that:

(1) I liked the product; and

(2) There’s something in it for my readers (ie: you!)

And in this case, there’s definitely both on the table. Plus a recipe that I really enjoyed creating (and that the family really enjoyed eating). Bonus!

tasty flavoursome meatballs

tasty flavoursome meatballs

So here’s the down-low. DON’s (of the “Is DON. Is good.” catchphrase of my childhood) has manged to snag themselves a fleishmeister. And if there’s something I love almost as much as chowing down on a bratwurst, it’s a hock-inducing, multisyllabic German word.

It’s not easy to snag a fleishmeister. They’re a rare breed – and years of study in the art of ham, sausage, pate and salami making is required before the title can be conferred. Unlike me, fleishmeisters are well trained to select the right types of meat, spices and the levels of salt and sugar that are required to make a well rounded and flavoursome product. Making a piece of processed meat last for months without a bevvy of preservatives? The fleishmeister can! (I would merely succeed in giving a bunch of people a bad case of food poisoning.)

And the best thing about having a fleishmeister on board at DON’s? I’ve solved my little herb-spice-seasoning quandry.

I was challenged to make up a recipe that used a DON’s product in it. Any product. Any recipe. I thought about doing pizza, calzone or a fried rice dish, but wanted to make the most of the flavours that were being infused in the meat. So I had this crazy idea.

not so bland anymore...

not so bland anymore…

My meatballs? They tend to be on the bland side. Tasty, juicy, and flavoursome… but bland. So what if I got the fleishmeister to season them for me… Brilliant!

I’ve stuck my recipe for Don’s Salami Meatballs at the bottom of this post – and before you say “Very nice Shez. I could do better” and click on the little x to close this window, I’m going to let you prove yourself right. Remember how I said I only did things for would benefit you, my lovely readers? Here it is.

There’s this competition that Don’s is holding, you see. And all you need to do is post the recipe for your very own “Don’s Ultimate Gourmet Creation” on this here website for the chance to win dinner at a top restaurant in your home city.

And so, for mine!

preparing the veges

don's smoked salami meatballs
Serves: 5
 
The best thing about this recipe? Not having to dig through your spice rack for a bit of paprika and another bit of thyme and going to the shops to pick up one sprig of some herb that you aren't going to use again. Also, the family digs it, and that's alright by me. This recipe serves four hungry footy players, six skinny twenty-somethings or one four person family with leftovers to fight over for lunch.
Ingredients
  • 1 DON's Hungarian Salami
  • 500g veal + pork mince
  • 1 egg
  • 1 stick of celery
  • ½ an onion
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 1 chilli
  • 375ml red wine
How to make it
  1. Step by step instructions with images below

 

How to do it:

peel & grate the salami

peel & grate the salami

1. Let’s make meatballs! Pull your salami out of its protective wrapping and peel it. That’s right. You heard me. Grab the skin at one end of the salami and pull until it’s been skinned. Now grate about two-thirds of it into a bowl.

2. Chop the remaining 1/3 of the salami into smallish chunks. You could grate the entire thing, but I like the texture of a salami chunk in my meatball. It’s like hitting a raisin in Christmas pudding. But without the sweetness.

mix up the meatball mix

mix up the meatball mix

3. Take a small handful of the grated salami out of the bowl and put it aside for the sauce. Toss the rest of the grated salami and your salami chunks in a bowl with the mince meat and an egg. Mix it all up with your hands and form it into meatballs. You won’t need any seasoning because we’re getting it all from the salami.

stir, stir, stir... ahhh softness!

stir, stir, stir… ahhh softness!

4. To the sauce! Dice all of the ingredients finely and heat up a couple of tablespoons of olive oil in a heavy bottomed pot. Add the celery and onion and cook over a low heat until the onion is translucent.

5. Now add the grated salami that you set aside, the garlic and the chilli. Fry it off until you can smell the flavour. Try not to drool.

6. Tip in your red wine and bring it to the boil. Once the mix is boiling, turn down the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

sizzle sizzle!

sizzle sizzle!

7. Fry your meatballs in (a different) heavy bottomed pot using a little oil. You’re not trying to cook them through at this stage, just to give them a nice sealed brown surface.

8. Once that’s done, tip the sauce over the top, put the lid on and simmer for another 10 minutes and you’re done!

9. Serve it up with some pasta for a tasty meal!

yum yum

yum yum

 

This post is sponsored by Nuffnang (cos a girl’s gotta pay hosting fees somehow). The opinions, comments and recipes in this blog are the bloggers own and have not been supplied by Don Smallgoods


  • #1
    December 7th, 2009

    Yammy! Look delicious!!!

  • #2
    December 7th, 2009

    I would hardly consider you a faux foodie. Quite the opposite actually. I take “foodie” as someone that has a love, passion and interest for learning about and, more importantly, eating food. Not so much the other definition of the elitist food fad crazy tosser that derrives a level of status from the places they eat, the exotic nature, price and/or exclusivity of their food/ingredients.

    Found it quite interesting that you chose to mince up the salami rather than using slices. Was it able to stand up on its own amongst the rest of the mince?

  • #3
    December 7th, 2009

    mmm salami meatballs sounds so tasty!

  • #4
    December 7th, 2009

    Mmmm I do like their salamis and I was glad I was cutting it cos I could ninja some as I did haha

  • #5
    December 8th, 2009

    Yummmmm. Salami meatballs. The chilli would have added quite a kick.

  • #6
    December 8th, 2009

    Ooo.. great idea grating the salami to be apart of the meatballs. I think they would be super tasty!

Shez