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malaysian mondays #04: a rainy day

September 21, 2009

I remember doing a healthy eating survey at school one day. I would have been maybe six, or seven. The first question we were asked was “Do you eat breakfast every day”. That was an easy one. It was my answer to the second question that piqued my class’s interest though. The question? “What do you have for breakfast?”

It seems innocuous enough, but at that stage of my life (and indeed, for years and years after) breakfast consisted of chicken nuggets. Or meat pies. Pizza. Rice with meat and veges. Soup with toast. And sometimes – when we were running late and the shopping hadn’t been done – there was cereal.

It wasn’t til that point in time that I realised that not all kids ate those foods for breakfast. And, for a couple of days afterwards, I refused to eat what was served for fear of being too “weird”. But the smell of a hot breakfast tempted me back into its warm arms soon after and I never looked back. Well, not until the day I started having tummy issues and couldn’t eat a thing at all… but that’s a different story altogether.

Today’s Malaysian Monday (and oh wow am I loving these posts) is all about breakfast. Breakfast at Cheong Foh to be exact. And, just for a little treat, a stop at our very favourite chendol hut.

breakfast at cheong foh

kopi-o at cheong foh

kopi-o at cheong foh

We have gone to Cheong Foh to escape the pouring rain. It can be hard to find a table here, but we manage (miraculously) to nab two of them and settle in for the long haul.

My Ah-kong orders a Kopi-o (which is, essentially, black coffee, no sugar) and sips at it contentedly.

teh tarik and milo eis (background)

teh tarik and milo eis (background)

My sister and I have much sweeter tastes and go for a teh tarik (oh love!) and milo eis. I don’t know what they put in the milo eis (pronounced mee-lo and not my-lo) in Malaysia, but it’s just so so good. So good, in fact, that I resort to stealing sips from my sister’s glass when she’s not looking. I really hope she doesn’t read that last sentence…

hainan chicken rice

hainan chicken rice

Said sister has (after realising that there is no char kway teow at Cheong Foh) ordered a serve of Hainan Chicken Rice for breakfast. It (sadly) comes with an abundance of breast meat and hardly any of the slippery brown meat that we are always fighting for. The meat is lovely and tender though, and the rice is fragrant. I may have stolen a couple of bites of this too.

ingredients for yong taufu

ingredients for yong taufu

Dad has spotted pre-stuffed ingredients for Yong Taufu sitting on a benchtop and promptly heads over to order this. It is an assortment of vegetables (including bittergourd and eggplant) and tofu sheets stuffed with a fish tofu topped with a sweet beany sauce.

yong taufu

yong taufu

He tries to foist some onto me (successfully I may add, and without much effort on his part seeing as I am quite happy to accept food donations of most kinds) and I enjoy it much more than the soupy version.

wonton mee

wonton mee

But my attention is here. With wonton mee. And oh, I could write pages on wonton mee (and I probably have over the course of this blog). This verison is particularly good, despite the dry looking char siew (the slices of pork you see with a red outer).

chai tow kway

chai tow kway

Having eaten wonton mee already on the trip, I pass some of my plate over to my mother (on the other table, whose breakfasts I neglect to photograph) and instead dig into the latest arrivals on my own table. Chai Tow Kway (a moreish mix of fried radish and flour cakes) and kaya toast with its crustless white bread and coconut jam and butter wonderfulness. I realise wonderfulness isn’t a word, but that’s just how great kaya toast is. It is imaginary word great.

the chendol man

the chendol stall

the chendol stall

And just for an added bit (that isn’t breakfasty at all), the chendol man.

My dad tells me that he has been visiting this very same chendol store since he was a kid. Located just behind the Klang train station, and a block away from the Klang Hospital, it is now run by the son of the original chendol man.

chendol

chendol

We pop by with family friends who are visiting from Sarawak and order serves of chendol. It is declared a winner with its palm sugar and coconut milk sweetness, its slippery green worms and the mini-mountain of shaved ice atop.

indian rojak

indian rojak

The Indian Rojak (not to be confused with the Malay Rojak, which has a different sauce atop) is similarly delicious, and it is only due to my increasingly full stomach that I do not order a serve of my own.

Well, that and the fact that we are sitting underneath a rigged up tarpaulin and the clouds look fit to burst at any second.

the chendol man

the chendol man


  • #1
    September 21st, 2009

    hmmm the hainan chicken looks bit sad, where’s all the skin??!?!?! I can’t help but feel ripped off! What’s the red thing in the chendol, that’s something new to me.

  • #2
    September 21st, 2009

    oh a cendol stall! i wish we had those in sydney! everything looks so tasty. mmmm at the chai tow kway…

  • #3
    September 21st, 2009

    Ahh I’m loving these posts too! I like the story about the chendol man, keeping in the family with son of chendol man 😀 Oh and that’s right, you must pronounce it mee-lo not my-lo when you’re there!

  • #4
    September 22nd, 2009

    Reading this entry makes me realise how deprived I am of malaysian food 🙁 the only thing I know is mamak 🙁

  • #5
    andrew tan
    October 23rd, 2010

    for those in sydney dying for indian rojak, this is available at Sambal restaurant in north ryde or at Sinma restaurant in kingsford. Does anyone know of other places offering this?

Shez